How I built my own Disc Golf Targets

I wanted to make my own disc golf targets mainly because most quality targets cost over $300. I had to find a way to make my own targets.

I thought about it all winter, and came up with a plan. I thought I would put it on the Internet so that more people could make more courses.

figure 1

I first got some plywood wire reels that were at 26"in diameter. You could buy plywood and cut out a 26" circle. I drilled 12 holes equally around the plywood. The holes should be 24" across from each other. I purchased 12 eye bolts for each target. I put a nut on the eye bolt then a washer, then inserted them in each of the twelve holes I drilled, then put on another washer and another nut. I then tightened the nut closest to the eye (the bottom nut) so that the top nut would be flush with the end of the bolt.

When all 12 eye bolts were attached to the plywood, I used pliers to unbend the eye enough to insert the first link of a 26" piece of galvanized chain. I then bent the eye back closed.

 

I made brackets to attach the chain assembly to the pole out of four 8" pieces of 1" by 1/8" flat stock. I drilled holes 1" from each end and 3" from each end (4 holes in all). I then bent each piece at the midway point into right angles. I painted the flat stock pieces with enamel paint to prevent rust. I then used wood screws to screw the brackets onto the plywood, leaving 2" between each opposing piece where the top of the pole will set.

 

 

At this point, then ends of the chain are threaded through a 3" split ring key chain ring. Be careful the chain is not twisted when you insert the bottom link into the split ring. The chain assembly is now complete. I will attach it to the pole by wrapping a couple of 3" stainless steel hose clamps around the 4 brackets with the top of the pole situated between them, and tighten the hose clamps to hold the brackets tightly against the pole. See figure 1. I sealed the edges of the plywood with caulking and painted them. I then attached a square piece of 90# rolled roofing, to prevent the plywood from rotting in the weather.

figure 2

The basket is made from a galvanized sheet metal ring that I had made at a local sheet metal place. It is 7" in height and 26" in diameter. See figure 2.

The bottom weave of the basket is made from fiberglass lawn chair webbing. I used 4 pieces in each direction and attached them to the metal ring by drilling holes and pop riveting each end to the ring. At each intersection I pierced a brass paper fastener through both pieces of webbing to prevent the occasional disc from sliding through the webbing sideways.

 

figure 3

The basket is attached to the pole with brackets made from four 21" pieces of 1" by 1/8" flat stock. Figure 4 is a side view of one of these brackets. I drilled holes 1" and 3" from one end. I painted the flat stock pieces with enamel paint to prevent rust. Finally, I used pop rivets to attach each bracket to the metal ring, being sure that the brackets are equally spaced around the ring.

figure 4

The basket is attached to the pole by wrapping a couple of 3" stainless steel hose clamps around the 4 brackets with the pole situated between them, and then tightened the hose clamps to hold them tightly against the pole.

I pounded a 2" galvanized pipe 8' long into the ground so that the top of the pipe was about 5' out of the ground. Then I clamped on the basket, and clamped on the chain assembly. Presto chango we started to play.

Front 9 and back 9 of my course

I used only 6 targets for my 18 hole course, which covers about 2 acres. I developed a route which used several different approaches to each target to make 18 holes. That's about it! any questions

E-Mail Rev. Rick

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